Chinese Colors

Studying the culture of ancient peoples, we find the styles in which color was used mainly as symbols of different social classes or castes, or as a symbolic sign of mythological or religious ideas. In China, yellow – the brightest color – meant for the emperor, the Son Sky. Nobody else dared to wear yellow clothing. Yellow was the symbol of supreme wisdom and enlightenment. If the Chinese put on mourning clothes white, it meant that they were accompanied by the passing into the realm of purity and sky. White was not an expression of personal grief, it was worn, as if helping the deceased attain the supreme kingdom.

If during the pre-Columbian Mexico, the artist used in his compositions figure dressed in red clothing, everyone understood that we are talking about the god of the earth Ksipetotek, and thus on the eastern horizon of its meaning sunrise, birth, adolescence, and scales. In other words, the figure had a red color is not for reasons of visual aesthetics or is of particular expressive – the color was symbolic here, like logos, logogram in shorthand, or hieroglyphics. In the Catholic Church, the spiritual hierarchy expressed in the color symbolism of clothes: purple for the cardinal and white – for dads. For each Church festival priests were put on the clothes prescribed colors. It goes without saying that the truly religious art refers to the color symbolically. When it comes to studying the emotional and expressive impact of color, we appeal to our great masters – El Greco, and Grunewald.

This entry was posted in General and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.